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Thursday, January 6, 2011

Dead birds found in Kentucky, Sweden, as crabs wash up in United Kingdom

Doomsday believers got more signs of the apocalypse on Wednesday, as reports of mass animal deaths continued to emerge around the world.
Hundreds of dead birds were found on the streets in Murray, Kentucky, officials announced Wednesday, marking the second time this week that the state has made such a discovery. Earlier in the week, several dozen dead birds were found in Gilbertsville Kentucky, according to local station WPSD.
Hundreds of dead birds along the side of the Morganza Hwy. in Louisiana on Monday.
The animal deaths in the western part of the state seem to have occurred last week, according to state officials, who told The Associated Press they discovered the dead grackles, red wing blackbirds, robins and starlings after someone called police with a tip.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources spokesman Mark Marraccini said the birds were not found to have diseases and did not appear to have ingested poisons, based on test results. He cited weather or natural events as possible explanations, according to the AP.
Sweden also reported discovering 50 dead jackdaw birds on a street in Stockholm, while 40,000 dead crabs washed up on beaches in England, according to European media reports.
These reports come on the heels of a string of mass animal death stories from ArkansasMarylandBrazil and New Zealand, which have caused many to joke or speculate that the world is on the verge of the apocalypse.
So far, however, each incident has been accompanied by a seemingly scientific explanation.
The birds in Kentucky may have died as a result of fireworks in the area, officials told the AP, while environmental experts say cold water likely led to the demise of the crabs in the U.K.
Cold water was also labeled the culprit in the deaths of millions of fish in Maryland's Chesapeake Bay this week.
That may be the result of climate change -- this winter marked the chilliest December to hit Britain in 120 years, according to the Daily Mail.
The panic began when roughly 5,000 dead blackbirds dropped from the sky on New Years Day in Beebe, Ark, causing some residents to call 911.
"They are like bleeding out of the mouth and some of them are not dead. I think they have been poisoned," said one caller, in a 911 call released this week.
Despite the unusual timing of the events, officials say the explanation is probably nothing out of the ordinary.
As wildlife expert Tony Child told the Star, "It's just part of the circle of life."

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Mobile Prison Guard Towers Coming to a Walmart near You

You will not belive this, they are ready to make our life a prison in the name of freedom!!!

3 Very Large Objects In Space Flying To Earth

E.T. does not need to phone home anymore, someone, or something is on it’s way to earth.
SETI Astrophysicist Craig Kasnov has announced the approach to the Earth of 3 very large, very fast moving objects.  The length of the "flying saucers" is in the range of tens of kilometers.  Landing, according to calculations of scientists, should be in mid-December 2012. Date coincides with the end of the Mayan calendar.
A few very large objects rapidly approaching the Earth - says SETI astrophysicist Craig Kasnov.  Don’t take his word for it you can check it out for yourself.  He recommends to go to the site http://www.sky-map.org/ and enter the coordinates of the giant UFO:
19 25 12 -89 46 03 - the first large object
16 19 35 -88 43 10 - a cylindrical object
02 26 39 -89 43 13 - the object as a circle
The project participants are assured that the facilities are absolutely real, and the American space agency NASA is trying to conceal important information.  
None of these objects can be seen from the northern hemisphere. The second set of numbers in each line tells us that the "object" or "objects" is/are coming in from very deep in the southern hemisphere sky.
In any case, the only thing we can do now - wait for it - says Kasnov. - Soon celestial objects will be visible in a good telescope.

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Natural disasters 'killed 295,000 in 2010'

FRANKFURT — The Haiti earthquake and floods in Pakistan and China helped make 2010 an exceptional year for natural disasters, killing 295,000 and costing $130 billion, the world's top reinsurer said Monday.
"The high number of weather-related natural catastrophes and record temperatures both globally and in different regions of the world provide further indications of advancing climate change," said Munich Re in a report.
The last time so many people died in natural disasters was in 1983, when 300,000 people died, mainly due to famine in Ethiopia, spokesman Gerd Henghuber told AFP.
A total of 950 natural disasters were recorded last year, making 2010 the second worst year since 1980. The average number of events over the past 10 years was 785.
And in terms of economic cost, insured losses amounted to approximately $37 billion, putting 2010 among the six most loss-intensive years for the insurance industry since 1980.
"2010 showed the major risks we have to cope with. There were a number of severe earthquakes. The hurricane season was also eventful," said Torsten Jeworrek, the firm's chief executive.
The earthquake in Haiti in January was by far the worst disaster in terms of human cost, killing 222,570 people, Munich Re said. Some 56,000 died in a combination of heatwaves and forest fires in Russia, it said.
The other most destructive events were an earthquake in China in April that killed 2,700, floods in Pakistan between July and September that cost 1,760 lives and August floods in China in which 1,470 perished.
Although the Haiti earthquake resulted in human devastation on a "staggering scale", it cost the industry very little as very few people in the poverty-stricken country can afford insurance.
However, an earthquake in Chile that hit over a month later was the world's most expensive natural disaster last year, with overall losses of 30 billion dollars and insured losses of eight billion dollars.
The second most expensive disaster for the insurance industry was a series of earthquakes that rattled New Zealand, which cost an estimated 3.3 billion dollars but caused no deaths.
The global distribution of natural catastrophes in 2010 was however "comparable to that of previous years," Munich Re said.
The American continent suffered the most disasters -- 365 in total -- with 310 in Asia. A total of 120 natural disasters were recorded in Europe, 90 in Africa and 65 in Australia and Oceania.
In 2009, considered a "benign" year due to the absence of major catastrophes and a less severe than usual hurricane season in the North Atlantic, there were 900 "destructive natural hazard events", costing some 60 billion dollars.
Around 11,000 people lost their lives in natural disasters in 2009, well below the average of 77,000.
Last month, another major reinsurer, Swiss Re, reported that man-made and natural disasters generated worldwide economic losses of 222 billion dollars in 2010, more than three times the figure for the previous year.
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Pay with your Phone

Contactless payment could make mobile phones the new credit cards in 2011

Visa has already installed some contactless payment terminals in selected shops.
Contactless payment could mean mobiles phones can be used as a credit card next year.

The near field communication (NFC) technology has already been installed in selected shops by Visa and the handheld gadgets could be the next step, the Herald Sun reports.

A store's Aussie credit terminal can take payments by reading a high-frequency signal around 10 cm from the phone taken from a chip.

Eric Schmidt, Google chief executive, noted one of the organisation's new phones - the Nexus S - will come with an NFC chip and the technology to use it.

He added: "You will be able to take these mobile devices that will be able to do commerce and, essentially, bump for everything and eventually replace credit cards."

This comes after Jennifer Doggett, a member of the Centre for Policy Development, writing for the Sydney Morning Herald, suggested the introduction of a medical credit card to pay for a variety of healthcare could be useful.